Home Builder Birmingham, Michigan – Mazza Building & Development Company

birmingham mi custom home builderIf you are interested in a custom home in Birmingham MI and surrounding areas, please contact the experienced team at Mazza Building & Development Company (248) 625-3306 today!

The Latest Trends in Home Construction and Renovations:

NATURAL SELECTIONS Step away from the super-dark, hand-scraped floors for a second. Consider engineered woods with a lighter, more natural finish. Our experts say that white, gray, and washed-wood finishes are making a comeback. Think about bleached, limed, or fumed woods with matte finishes or sealed-only floors. Don’t count out engineered products. They aren’t necessarily cheaper, but you can achieve a more exotic look. You might also consider porcelain tiles. Porcelanosa’s Parker line boasts a “wood” look. Stone floors are also showing up in unexpected places, like master bedrooms.Fun Fact: To get the look of steel windows, your contractor can match wood on the inside of the window to the color of the outside of the window. Steel versus wood could be a $50,000 difference in price!CLEAN LINES, MORE OPEN SPACES

Open floor plans—like this one from Sharif & Munir—are happening even in traditional homes.

Our experts say that, on the whole, new construction is going more contemporary. This doesn’t mean that everyone is moving into glorious, Rachofsky-like glass houses. But on the whole, houses have cleaner lines with less focus on turrets and more use of Austin stone and standing-seam roofs. Europhiles, relax. The Mediterranean isn’t going anywhere—this is Italy Dallas, after all.

Even those who choose to stay with more traditional exteriors are going with modern, open concepts on the inside. That means fewer hallways and tiny, wasted rooms. Open floor plans afford more useable space — the kitchen that opens to the den and possibly dining areas. An abundance of glass and lift-and-slide doors, designed to open and disappear, bring the outdoors in. Again, efficiency is key. Homeowners are better understanding that 100 percent of their spaces should be completely usable.

Powder rooms  are the perfect places to try out that bold wallpaper that you’re too afraid to try anyplace else.

TAKE SOME RISKS

Even the most risk-averse person should have some fun when building their dream home. Maybe you’re not ready to wallpaper all the ceilings. Fine. But get on board with the glass and metal trends and employ both on your staircase. In fact, why not create a fabulous, floating staircase? Too contemporary? Consider patterned woods, intricate wood designs, or an iron-and-steel combination. (On a side note, you might only need to do one staircase. It seems fewer new homes have two sets of stairs because they take up so much square footage.)

The powder bath is also a great place to try a bold wallpaper, daring paint color, or outrageous tile and hardware. There’s nothing better than stepping into an unexpected and divine powder bath. But what if you hate it? That’s a drag, but it’s not the end of the world. “It’s such a small space, so it’s not significant to change it. That’s why it’s a good place to take chances,” Michael Munir says.

FORMAL REFORMED

There has been a lot of talk about how the formal living and dining rooms have been eradicated from new homes, but that’s simply not true. The rooms still exist; they function differently. The formal living room is now more of a “parlor” or an “away room,” as in, “I have to get away from the televisions that seem to have shown up in every flipping room, including outdoor spaces, in this house.” Many people choose to make it multi-functional — it could be a library and a bar area. It could open to the patio and be more of a party room. The point is, it doesn’t disappear from the floor plan. It just becomes something that you’ll actually use for more than fancy-but-uncomfortable furniture storage.

Likewise, the designated dining room still exists, but it’s more open and casual. It could be the serving space for even more casual parties. Add bookcases, and, it, too could become a library.

KITCHEN CONVERSATION

We’ve all heard it: Kitchens (and baths) sell homes. Kitchens are the heart of the home. Grandma’s kitchen: Tasters welcome. We get it! Kitchens are important. But they’re also expensive. Jennifer Fordham of Poggenpohl Dallas says she tries to educate her clients from the beginning about what things cost and parse their needs. “I have to tell them that they don’t need drawers in every single inch of the kitchen,” she says. “You have to think about the odd-shaped things that won’t fit in a drawer.” She also says ventilation is key—folks come in the showroom and ask if there’s any way around having it at all. “They think it’s ugly, but you need it, if only to pass code,” she says with a laugh.

We’ve come to expect stainless steel and granite in high-end kitchens, but maybe it’s time to expand your horizons. “Granite used to be a premium, but now it’s everywhere,” Michael Munir says. “Most apartments have granite now.” Consider engineered stone and other countertop options.

As for stainless steel, it’s still a thing. But like granite, it’s pretty standard stuff. You might want to take a chance on some of the new designs that Miele is producing — basically glassed appliances in all black, white, or chocolate. Think how fantastic they’ll look with the tasteful Ann Sacks tile and Waterworks plumbing fixtures you’ve so carefully chosen.

For cabinets, think about some of the lighter woods or more natural-colored walnuts, or go bold with some matte lacquers. Fordham says white kitchens are coming back, too.

No matter your tastes, we can all agree that the two most important items in your kitchen will be a Hoshizaki ice maker and the Miele Whole Bean/Ground Coffee System. Sonic ice and caffeine always make everything better.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS

People are recognizing that the backyard has long been under-utilized square footage. In the quest to make every inch of property useful and liveable, indoor spaces are opening directly to the backyard or to patios with pizza ovens and fire pits. But the glare of the spotlight comes at a cost: Backyards are expensive. That outdoor kitchen may cost more than the kitchen inside your dream house. That photo you found on Houzz of the backyard with the swimming pool, lush landscaping, elaborate lighting, and pristine pizza oven could add up to $250,000. So budget accordingly.

As you create your at-home resort, consider stone flooring or interesting concrete finishes. Glenn Bonick says elements like raw or rusted steels are being used for retainers as well as decorative touches mixed with ipe woods for decks. It’s 200 degrees in the summer, so pools will always be a thing here, but many folks are going smaller.

THE NEW MEDIA

As previously mentioned, every single room in the modern home boasts a television, so unless your family insists on a theater setting for viewings of Phineas and Ferb, the media room may be wasted, isolated space. People want a room that’s more accessible and useful, so it’s become more of a playroom for the kids and/or an adult game room. Obviously, the large television(s) remains, but the need for theater seating has subsided. If you incorporate a media room, put it on the ground floor. Builders say that second- or third-floor media rooms tend not to get used.
source: dmmagazine.com

For more information about having the home of your dreams, call the Birmingham MI custom home building experts at Mazza Building & Development Company (248) 625-3305.

Custom Home Builder Bloomfield Hills MI

custom homes bloomfield hills miMazza Building & Development Company prides itself in offering the latest styles and trends of custom homes. Please call our experienced team at (248) 625-3305 for more information about custom homes in Bloomfield Hills MI.

Trends in Custom Homes

Green Building Concern for the environment is growing among U.S. households—and so are energy costs. Because of this, many custom builders are embracing green building techniques. Features like solar panels, water-saving appliances, insulation to improve heating efficiency and the use of renewable or recycled building materials are all popular techniques to improve a home’s efficiency. Custom builders allow buyers to include a wide range of green products and give them the opportunity to weigh each cost and benefit to create a home that is stylish, comfortable, but also eco-friendly.
To find out more about green building you can visit NAHB’s Green Building & Energy Efficiency page.

New Amenities Specialized amenities really set custom homes apart. Today home owners like to see features that will improve their lifestyle through health, entertainment or comfort. Yoga studios, resistance pools and fitness rooms can be added to encourage healthy living; game rooms, theaters and even a bowling alley can be added for fun; and for comfort, breezy, screened-in porches or warm hearths can make your home feel cozy and welcoming.

Custom amenities are also taking a turn to the world of tech. In world where there’s an app for everything, buyers are beginning to expect a custom home to do more and be “smart.” Nowadays you can control many features in your home using a phone, controlling energy usage, security systems, lighting and even the music playing in each room.

The Atkinson Residence in Berlin, Md. won a silver award in the 2012 Best in American Living Awards for its use of layered balconies and porches that make the most of the home’s spectacular view of the water. This nook is an example of the unique architectural details often included in custom homes.

Multigenerational Living Whether it’s aging parents moving in with their adult children or young adults living back with Mom and Dad, multigenerational households have specific needs when it comes to a home.
Custom builders are seeing an increasing need to tailor homes to this lifestyle. According to a 2011 study by the Pew Research Center, 39% of adults ages 18 to 34 have had to move in with their parents in recent years. In the same year, the U.S. Census reported that 4.3 out of 76 million households were made up of at least three generations.
Multigenerational families often build homes that include the traditional “mother-in-law suite” or even feature a locked-off living space within the home. These apartment-style spaces can have their own kitchenette, full bathroom and living areas to provide a sense of privacy and independence.

Universal Design As the country grows older and many baby boomers look to retirement, Universal Design (UD) features are an ever-growing priority for many custom buyers and builders. UD is used to ensure that features like wider doors, lower countertops and fewer stairs are used to create a home that everyone can enjoy comfortably. An accessible home allows owners to age in place, prolonging their ability to stay in the house independently and can also increase value by opening the market to any future buyer, despite age, stature or ability.
source: nahb.org

If you are interested in a custom home in Bloomfield Hills MI and nearby areas, please call the custom home building experts at Mazza Building & Development Company (248) 625-3305  for more information today!

Custom Home Builder Birmingham MI

custom home birmingham miMazza Building & Development Company prides itself in offering the latest styles and trends of custom homes. Please call our experienced team at (248) 625-3305 for more information about custom homes in Birmingham MI.

Trends in Custom Homes

Green Building Concern for the environment is growing among U.S. households—and so are energy costs. Because of this, many custom builders are embracing green building techniques. Features like solar panels, water-saving appliances, insulation to improve heating efficiency and the use of renewable or recycled building materials are all popular techniques to improve a home’s efficiency. Custom builders allow buyers to include a wide range of green products and give them the opportunity to weigh each cost and benefit to create a home that is stylish, comfortable, but also eco-friendly.
To find out more about green building you can visit NAHB’s Green Building & Energy Efficiency page.

New Amenities Specialized amenities really set custom homes apart. Today home owners like to see features that will improve their lifestyle through health, entertainment or comfort. Yoga studios, resistance pools and fitness rooms can be added to encourage healthy living; game rooms, theaters and even a bowling alley can be added for fun; and for comfort, breezy, screened-in porches or warm hearths can make your home feel cozy and welcoming.

Custom amenities are also taking a turn to the world of tech. In world where there’s an app for everything, buyers are beginning to expect a custom home to do more and be “smart.” Nowadays you can control many features in your home using a phone, controlling energy usage, security systems, lighting and even the music playing in each room.

The Atkinson Residence in Berlin, Md. won a silver award in the 2012 Best in American Living Awards for its use of layered balconies and porches that make the most of the home’s spectacular view of the water. This nook is an example of the unique architectural details often included in custom homes.

Multigenerational Living Whether it’s aging parents moving in with their adult children or young adults living back with Mom and Dad, multigenerational households have specific needs when it comes to a home.
Custom builders are seeing an increasing need to tailor homes to this lifestyle. According to a 2011 study by the Pew Research Center, 39% of adults ages 18 to 34 have had to move in with their parents in recent years. In the same year, the U.S. Census reported that 4.3 out of 76 million households were made up of at least three generations.
Multigenerational families often build homes that include the traditional “mother-in-law suite” or even feature a locked-off living space within the home. These apartment-style spaces can have their own kitchenette, full bathroom and living areas to provide a sense of privacy and independence.

Universal Design As the country grows older and many baby boomers look to retirement, Universal Design (UD) features are an ever-growing priority for many custom buyers and builders. UD is used to ensure that features like wider doors, lower countertops and fewer stairs are used to create a home that everyone can enjoy comfortably. An accessible home allows owners to age in place, prolonging their ability to stay in the house independently and can also increase value by opening the market to any future buyer, despite age, stature or ability.
source: nahb.org

If you are interested in a custom home in Birmingham MI and nearby areas, please call the custom home building experts at Mazza Building & Development Company (248) 625-3305  for more information today!

Home Builder Rochester Hills

custom-home-rochester-hills-miIf you are interested in a custom home in Rochester Hills MI and surrounding areas, please contact the experienced team at Mazza Building & Development Company (248) 625-3306 today!

The Latest Trends in Home Construction and Renovations:

NATURAL SELECTIONSStep away from the super-dark, hand-scraped floors for a second. Consider engineered woods with a lighter, more natural finish. Our experts say that white, gray, and washed-wood finishes are making a comeback. Think about bleached, limed, or fumed woods with matte finishes or sealed-only floors. Don’t count out engineered products. They aren’t necessarily cheaper, but you can achieve a more exotic look. You might also consider porcelain tiles. Porcelanosa’s Parker line boasts a “wood” look. Stone floors are also showing up in unexpected places, like master bedrooms.

Fun Fact: To get the look of steel windows, your contractor can match wood on the inside of the window to the color of the outside of the window. Steel versus wood could be a $50,000 difference in price!

CLEAN LINES, MORE OPEN SPACES

Open floor plans—like this one from Sharif & Munir—are happening even in traditional homes.

Our experts say that, on the whole, new construction is going more contemporary. This doesn’t mean that everyone is moving into glorious, Rachofsky-like glass houses. But on the whole, houses have cleaner lines with less focus on turrets and more use of Austin stone and standing-seam roofs. Europhiles, relax. The Mediterranean isn’t going anywhere—this is Italy Dallas, after all.

Even those who choose to stay with more traditional exteriors are going with modern, open concepts on the inside. That means fewer hallways and tiny, wasted rooms. Open floor plans afford more useable space — the kitchen that opens to the den and possibly dining areas. An abundance of glass and lift-and-slide doors, designed to open and disappear, bring the outdoors in. Again, efficiency is key. Homeowners are better understanding that 100 percent of their spaces should be completely usable.

Powder rooms  are the perfect places to try out that bold wallpaper that you’re too afraid to try anyplace else.

TAKE SOME RISKS

Even the most risk-averse person should have some fun when building their dream home. Maybe you’re not ready to wallpaper all the ceilings. Fine. But get on board with the glass and metal trends and employ both on your staircase. In fact, why not create a fabulous, floating staircase? Too contemporary? Consider patterned woods, intricate wood designs, or an iron-and-steel combination. (On a side note, you might only need to do one staircase. It seems fewer new homes have two sets of stairs because they take up so much square footage.)

The powder bath is also a great place to try a bold wallpaper, daring paint color, or outrageous tile and hardware. There’s nothing better than stepping into an unexpected and divine powder bath. But what if you hate it? That’s a drag, but it’s not the end of the world. “It’s such a small space, so it’s not significant to change it. That’s why it’s a good place to take chances,” Michael Munir says.

FORMAL REFORMED

There has been a lot of talk about how the formal living and dining rooms have been eradicated from new homes, but that’s simply not true. The rooms still exist; they function differently. The formal living room is now more of a “parlor” or an “away room,” as in, “I have to get away from the televisions that seem to have shown up in every flipping room, including outdoor spaces, in this house.” Many people choose to make it multi-functional — it could be a library and a bar area. It could open to the patio and be more of a party room. The point is, it doesn’t disappear from the floor plan. It just becomes something that you’ll actually use for more than fancy-but-uncomfortable furniture storage.

Likewise, the designated dining room still exists, but it’s more open and casual. It could be the serving space for even more casual parties. Add bookcases, and, it, too could become a library.

KITCHEN CONVERSATION

We’ve all heard it: Kitchens (and baths) sell homes. Kitchens are the heart of the home. Grandma’s kitchen: Tasters welcome. We get it! Kitchens are important. But they’re also expensive. Jennifer Fordham of Poggenpohl Dallas says she tries to educate her clients from the beginning about what things cost and parse their needs. “I have to tell them that they don’t need drawers in every single inch of the kitchen,” she says. “You have to think about the odd-shaped things that won’t fit in a drawer.” She also says ventilation is key—folks come in the showroom and ask if there’s any way around having it at all. “They think it’s ugly, but you need it, if only to pass code,” she says with a laugh.

We’ve come to expect stainless steel and granite in high-end kitchens, but maybe it’s time to expand your horizons. “Granite used to be a premium, but now it’s everywhere,” Michael Munir says. “Most apartments have granite now.” Consider engineered stone and other countertop options.

As for stainless steel, it’s still a thing. But like granite, it’s pretty standard stuff. You might want to take a chance on some of the new designs that Miele is producing — basically glassed appliances in all black, white, or chocolate. Think how fantastic they’ll look with the tasteful Ann Sacks tile and Waterworks plumbing fixtures you’ve so carefully chosen.

For cabinets, think about some of the lighter woods or more natural-colored walnuts, or go bold with some matte lacquers. Fordham says white kitchens are coming back, too.

No matter your tastes, we can all agree that the two most important items in your kitchen will be a Hoshizaki ice maker and the Miele Whole Bean/Ground Coffee System. Sonic ice and caffeine always make everything better.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS

People are recognizing that the backyard has long been under-utilized square footage. In the quest to make every inch of property useful and liveable, indoor spaces are opening directly to the backyard or to patios with pizza ovens and fire pits. But the glare of the spotlight comes at a cost: Backyards are expensive. That outdoor kitchen may cost more than the kitchen inside your dream house. That photo you found on Houzz of the backyard with the swimming pool, lush landscaping, elaborate lighting, and pristine pizza oven could add up to $250,000. So budget accordingly.

As you create your at-home resort, consider stone flooring or interesting concrete finishes. Glenn Bonick says elements like raw or rusted steels are being used for retainers as well as decorative touches mixed with ipe woods for decks. It’s 200 degrees in the summer, so pools will always be a thing here, but many folks are going smaller.

THE NEW MEDIA

As previously mentioned, every single room in the modern home boasts a television, so unless your family insists on a theater setting for viewings of Phineas and Ferb, the media room may be wasted, isolated space. People want a room that’s more accessible and useful, so it’s become more of a playroom for the kids and/or an adult game room. Obviously, the large television(s) remains, but the need for theater seating has subsided. If you incorporate a media room, put it on the ground floor. Builders say that second- or third-floor media rooms tend not to get used.
source: dmmagazine.com

For more information about having the home of your dreams, call the Rochester Hills MI custom home building experts at Mazza Building & Development Company (248) 625-3305.